Truth Code: truth
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Τετάρτη, 11 Ιανουαρίου 2017





What is Karma? Karma is the Sanskrit word for action. It is equivalent to Newton’s law of ‘every action must have a reaction’. When we think, speak or act we initiate a force that will react accordingly. This returning force maybe modified, changed or suspended, but most people will not be able eradicate it.

This law of cause and effect is not punishment, but is wholly for the sake of education or learning.A person may not escape the consequences of his actions, but he will suffer only if he himself has made the conditions ripe for his suffering. Ignorance of the law is no excuse whether the laws are man-made or universal.

To stop being afraid and to start being empowered in the worlds of karma and reincarnation, here is what you need to know about karmic laws.

1. THE GREAT LAW

- "As you sow, so shall you reap". This is also known as the "Law of Cause and Effect". 
- Whatever we put out in the Universe is what comes back to us. 
- If what we want is Happiness, Peace, Love, Friendship... Then we should BE Happy, Peaceful, Loving and a True Friend. 

2.THE LAW OF CREATION 

- Life doesn't just HAPPEN, it requires our participation. 
- We are one with the Universe, both inside and out. 
- Whatever surrounds us gives us clues to our inner state. 
- BE yourself, and surround yourself with what you want to have present in your Life. 

3.THE LAW OF HUMILITY 

- What you refuse to accept, will continue for you.
- If what we see is an enemy, or someone with a character trait that we find to be negative, then we ourselves are not focused on a higher level of existence. 

4.THE LAW OF GROWTH 

- "Wherever you go, there you are". 
- For us to GROW in Spirit, it is we who must change 
- and not the people, places or things around us. 
- The only given we have in our lives is OURSELVES and that is the only factor we have control over.
- When we change who and what we are within our heart our life follows suit and changes too. 

5.THE LAW OF RESPONSIBILITY

- Whenever there is something wrong in my life, there is something wrong in me. 
- We mirror what surrounds us - and what surrounds us mirrors us; this is a Universal Truth. 
- We must take responsibility what is in our life. 

6.THE LAW OF CONNECTION 

- Even if something we do seems inconsequential, it is very important that it gets done as everything in the Universe is connected. 
- Each step leads to the next step, and so forth and so on. 
- Someone must do the initial work to get a  job done. 
- Neither the first step nor the last are of greater significance, 
- As they were both needed to accomplish the task. 
- Past-Present-Future they are all connected... 

7.THE LAW OF FOCUS 

- You can not think of two things at the same time. 
- When our focus is on Spiritual Values, it is impossible for us to have lower thoughts such as greed or anger. 

8.THE LAW OF GIVING AND HOSPITALITY 

- If you believe something to be true,then sometime in your life you will be called upon to demonstrate that particular truth. 
- Here is where we put what we CLAIM that we have learned, into actual PRACTICE. 

9.THE LAW OF HERE AND NOW 

- Looking backward to examine what was, prevents us from being totally in the HERE AND NOW. 
- Old thoughts, old patterns of behavior, old dreams... 
- Prevent us from having new ones. THE LAW OF CHANGE 
- History repeats itself until we learn the lessons that we need to change our path. 

10.THE LAW OF PATIENCE AND REWARD 

- All Rewards require initial toil. 
- Rewards of lasting value require patient and persistent toil. 
- True joy follows doing what we're suppose to be doing, and waiting for the reward to come in on its  own time. 

11.THE LAW OF SIGNIFICANCE AND INSPIRATION 

- You get back from something whatever YOU have put into it. 
- The true value of something is a direct result of the energy and intent that is put into it. 
- Every personal contribution is also a contribution to the Whole. 
- Lack luster contributions have no impact on the Whole, nor do they work to diminish it. 
- Loving contributions bring life to, and inspire, the Whole. 

12. THE LAW OF CHANGE 

- History repeats itself until we learn the lessons that we need to change our path. 

Sources: Bliss Returned and Raven Emrys via social-consciousness
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Δευτέρα, 2 Ιανουαρίου 2017





The cost of intelligence, rumour has it, is insanity. Well, not exactly, but I got your attention so listen.

First of all, I hope you don’t take offense of my use words like, ‘madness’ or ‘lunacy’. If it makes you feel better, I’m mad as well. Now, let’s turn our attention back to our smarts.

There is a high cost for being intelligent. I don’t speak of intelligence from the classroom, per say. True intelligence is usually there long before the school years. There are characteristics which brand a person of intellectual nature. Now, we’ve established that.

It’s kind of complicated, in a way, but it would stand to reckon that when an individual is smart, they suffer from an over-abundance of thoughts-hence mental. Sometimes these thoughts are in disarray, fumbling over each other and striving for the spotlight. I guess this sounds silly, but imagine thoughts as millions of ants, all trying to get at the top of the pile. These are the thoughts of a highly intelligent person, but one who may lack the ability to focus. This is where we encounter our point. Mood disorders, mental imperfections and awkward personalities may stem from an intelligent mind.

Childhood

Psychologists have found that childhood high IQs are linked to early adulthood bipolar disorder. Although bipolar disorder is thought to be primarily genetic, being triggered by childhood trauma, now there’s a link to high IQ scores as well.

So, how did we test this?

To test the facts about childhood IQ and its connection with bipolar disorder, 1,881 children, age 8, were followed until they reached their early 20s. Along the way, IQ was measured and characteristics of mood disorders were recorded. Just a 10-point difference made a change in adult mental health. There were signs of bipolar mania. So, it’s true. All along the roadway of development those test subjects can quote ‘Queen’.

“I’m going slightly mad.”

Mad Creative Intelligence

Professor Daniel Smith, one of the authors of the study, reported,

A possible link between bipolar disorder, intelligence and creativity have been discussed for many years and studies have suggested a link.

Creativity has indeed been lumped with lunacy. As you know, art of all kinds has been an indicator of some sort of mood disorder. In fact, many artists, like Van Gogh, have displayed symptoms of mood disorders and we know how talented he was. Poets, like Poe, displayed symptoms of depression as well. Yes, I know we are talking about intelligence, but there’s a link here somewhere – a connection of the three – intelligence, mental illness and creativity. It takes a great mind to be able to tap into emotions needed for awe-inspiring works of art.

The truth of the matter

Of course, it’s not cut and dry. There is a clear connection, but we need to understand why. There are other factors, childhood adversity and drug use, which can trigger mood disruptions, namely bipolar disorder. The thing is, this could make others assume that those with bipolar disorder have a weak mind and cannot cope with the trauma and stress in life. On the contrary, those with bipolar disorder strive for a perfect world while fully aware of the immortal imperfections that will always remain. They just think too much and are aware of things that they rather not know.

Maybe I’m an advocate for mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder, and that’s because I suffer myself. There’s not one day that I’m free from racing thoughts, sleeplessness and strange bouts of inhuman energy – that’s the ordeal. Could I be intelligent? I have no idea, I don’t like to assume those things about myself. But yeah, there’s a price to pay and a huge one.

Appreciating great minds

The objective would be, in my opinion, to study these indicators so that children can learn how to control this massive amount of information that swirls within their brains. Also, raising awareness of this theory can speak volumes, and finding fact is key. For the rest, being kind and killing the stigma of mental illnesses, such as bipolar disorder, will bring acceptance of our intelligence. After all, we’re in this together… how cliché. 

Via: learning-mind.com

By Sherrie
Sherrie is a freelance writer and artist with over 10 years of experience. She spends most of her time giving life to the renegade thoughts. As the words erupt and form new life, she knows that she is yet again free from the nagging persistence of her muse. She is a mother of three and a lifetime fan of the thought-provoking and questionable aspects of the universe.
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Πέμπτη, 29 Δεκεμβρίου 2016


Stores want me to buy stuff I don’t need. The internet wants me to buy stuff I don’t need. But I finally figured it out.

I was only just beginning to think about fast fashion and how strange it was that clothes appeared to be getting cheaper while the rest of life grew more expensive.
I learned from my year of no shopping and refined my ways. But in 2012, I noticed I’d replaced my ambling flaneuse shopper persona with she who magically buys crap on the internet. I would meander from my design work to a blog featuring something cute, and before I knew it, I’d have wasted an hour looking at (and occasionally purchasing) things I absolutely didn’t need. So I stopped shopping again. This time, instead of buying the things I wanted, I painted them.
It was a revelatory experience in that I realized there is absolutely nothing wrong with appreciating beautiful things. In fact, it’s hard not to appreciate beautiful things in a world saturated with them. In a world that’s increasingly good at showing you just the kind of beautiful thing you most want to acquire. In a world where people toil expertly to make you want things. Why did I feel guilty for feeling desire?

At the same time I was beginning to learn of fast fashion’s implications beyond my pocketbook, of the gross toll on people and planet the ubiquity of cheap pretty things was taking. Just by admiring a pretty dress in a window, I somehow felt complicit in the system that brings such cruelly wasteful stuff to said window.
Drawing my covets freed up the guilt I felt and often absolved me of desire. But you don’t have to draw the things you want to help stop the impulse buy. Anything that creates some time to pause and reflect about why you want that shiny new thingamajig can do the trick.

Sarah Lazarovic wrote this article for 50 Solutions, the Winter 2017 issue of YES! Magazine. Sarah is an artist and creative director. As a journalist, she's worked for almost every publication in Canada, covering news and cultural events in comic form. In 2015, her live sketching of a Rob Ford speech won gold at the Online News Association awards. As a Massey Fellow at the University of Toronto in 2014, she studied behavioral economics and environmental sustainability. Her book, A Bunch of Pretty Things I Did Not Buy (Penguin 2014), is available at fine libraries everywhere.

Source: yesmagazine.org
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Τετάρτη, 28 Δεκεμβρίου 2016


Few animals in zoos are actually endangered; the rest are showcased to the public for entertainment purposes. Gaston Lacombe’s “Captive” series aims to expose this.

While the intention behind starting zoos might have been honorable, many have, unfortunately, become more similar to a car collection than an animal conservation effort.

As animal rights organization PETA has said, wildlife in captivity often “spend much of their time pacing, walking in tight circles, swaying or rolling their heads, and showing other signs of psychological distress.” Obviously, animals will always do best in the wild, roaming free in their natural setting, rather than living in poorly decorated and artificially lit living spaces.

Even the argument for conservation hits a few flat notes. Few animals in captivity are endangered, as Zoos prefer to showcase exotic species to wow the public. This is entertaining to humans, but not beneficial for the animals.

To be fair, there are beneficial organizations aiding in the conservation of endangered animals. The San Diego Zoo, for example, cares for Nola, one of the last four Northern White Rhinos in the world. Without their aid, she would likely be killed by poachers within days.

But, overall, it is the minority seeming to be investing in the well-being of the animal long-term, and this is likely why most animals in captivity live shorter lives than they do in the wild

This is exactly what photographer Gaston Lacombe sought to convey when shooting his series entitled Captive”. The pictures below expose the conditions many animals live in each day, detached from their natural origin.






Photo Credits: Credit: Gaston Lacombe
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Δευτέρα, 26 Δεκεμβρίου 2016

Consumer spending makes up 70% of the United States economy. We all have bills to pay and mouths to feed, but what do Americans actually spend on? Here is a breakdown of how Americans spent their money in the last 75 years (click to enlarge).
In the chart above, spending is broken into 12 categories: Reading, alcohol, tobacco, education, personal care, miscellaneous, recreation & entertainment, healthcare, clothing, food, transportation and housing. Each category is further broken down into spending by year, from 1941 to 2014, and each category is given a unique color. The data was collected from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The data is adjusted for inflation and measures median spending of all Americans.

Unsurprisingly, housing expenses have almost always been the largest area of spending in America for over 70 years. The only exception is 1941, when spending on food averaged $8,311, whereas spending on housing came to $7,537. However, in 1941 the government included alcohol in the food spending category, which inflates the food spending data for that year. In the other years, alcohol was given its own category. In every other year measured, spending on housing outpaced every other category.

Another interesting trend is the downward slope of spending on clothing. Americans spent the most on clothing in 1961 for an average of $4,157. In every year measured since 1961, spending on clothing fell, even when accounting for inflation.

At the same time, Americans began spending more on education, transportation and healthcare. Spending on education has increased far more than any other category, jumping from $242 in 1941 to $1,236 in 2014. Education spending increased at a particularly fast rate between 1984 and 1994 and onward. While spending on healthcare increased between 1941 and 2014, overall spending dipped between 1973 and 1984, but then began rising rapidly thereafter.

Between 1941 and 2014 Americans spent money on most of the same things, with a few changes. Housing has persisted as a large area of spending for Americans, as has the food category. However, spending on food and clothing has fallen when adjusting for inflation while spending on education and healthcare has risen quickly.

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Παρασκευή, 23 Δεκεμβρίου 2016





By Justin Garnder

On January 1, 2017, the state of Missouri will implement a public school policy sure to accelerate the descent into police state dystopia.

The Hazelwood School District put out a memo to parents and guardians stating that, according to Missouri statute, fights at school or on buses will be treated as felonies — which can result in up to four years of prison, fines or probation.

“Dear Parents/Guardians:

We want to make you aware of a few new State Statutes that will go into effect on January 1, 2017, which may have a drastic impact on how incidents are handled in area school districts.

The way the new statue reads, if a person commits the offense of an assault in the third degree this will now be classified as a Class E Felony, rather than a misdemeanor. If he or she knowingly causes physical injury to another person (hits someone or has a fight with another individual and an injury occurs) – one or both participants may be charged with a Felony.”

Gone are the days when teachers broke up fights and sent the kids home, calling the parents and perhaps suspending the kid if it was a serious incident. “School Resource Officers” or local cops now arrest the kids and, if there is any perceived injury (an arbitrary judgment), will charge them with third-degree assault – treating children cooped up in school as if they are violent adults on the streets.

“What does this mean for students?

For example, if two students are fighting and one child is injured, the student who caused the injury may be charged with a felony. Student(s) who are caught fighting in school, bus or on school grounds may now be charged with a felony (no matter the age or grade level), if this assault is witnessed by one of the School Resource Officers/police officers (SRO) or if the SRO/local law enforcement officials have to intervene.”

It doesn’t stop there. Even attempts or threats to cause harm will be treated as a Class A misdemeanor, which can bring up to a year of prison time. If the assaulted person is considered a “special victim,” a Class D felony can be imposed which can mean up to seven years in prison.

The Free Thought Project has reported on numerous examples of how public schools are increasingly relying on armed cops to carry out discipline, thereby criminalizing the age-old reality of children behaving badly.

This has resulted in the increasingly prevalent phenomenon known as the “school to prison pipeline.”

The Arizona State Law Journal found that over the last three decades, there has been a marked shift in public schools to using law enforcement instead of school administrators and teachers for students violating school rules.

Approximately 260,000 students were referred to law enforcement during the 2011-2012 school year, and about 92,000 students were arrested on school property. Unsurprisingly, these numbers affect disadvantaged minority students the most.

The Center for Public Integrity (CPI) documented disturbing examples of children being subjected to law enforcement, just as a shocking video emerged of a cop brutalizing a teenage girl in the classroom for misbehaving.

”Some police actions involve alarming physical altercations, with kids subdued and handcuffed. Others may be handled without much force. But law-enforcement involvement in school discipline has routinely resulted in kids—some as young as elementary school-age—summoned to court to answer charges that they committed crimes. Frequently, charges include battery or assault in connection with schoolyard fights or disorderly conduct or disturbing the peace at school —issues that some believe should be handled by school officials, not cops.”

The worst state is Virginia, with a rate of 16 students per 1,000 being referred to law enforcement. One school had a shocking 228 students, most between 11 and 14, that were referred to cops. A 12-year-old girl was charged with obstruction of justice for clenching her fist at a cop. 11-year-old Kayleb Moon-Robinson, who is autistic, was slammed to the floor for walking out of class too early, and then was charged with felony assault on a police officer and disorderly conduct.

Other shocking examples include five- and six-year-olds being handcuffed, arrested and booked into jail for throwing temper tantrums. Dress code violations, tardiness, and even passing gas have all led to students being referred to law enforcement.

CPI describes how early exposure to law enforcement and the “justice system” has a devastating impact on the mental health of children, and makes it more likely they will grow up to live all or part of their lives behind bars.

“…prosecuting kids in court for low-level accusations like disorderly conduct and battery is actually backfiring; kids become stigmatized, develop records and often disengage from school. The risk increases that they’ll progress to more serious trouble, especially if core emotional or mental-health or learning problems go unresolved or inadequately treated.”

The Arizona State Law Journal confirmed that incarceration increases delinquency and future involvement in the justice system, and “the official processing of a juvenile law violation may be the least effective means of rehabilitating juvenile offenders.”

“No one should underestimate the negative consequences associated with incarcerating a juvenile, both to our society as a whole and to the youth themselves, which is the end result of the school-to-prison pipeline. Empirical research demonstrates that incarceration produces long-term detrimental effects on youth, including reinforcement of violent attitudes and behaviors; more limited educational, employment, military, and housing opportunities; an increased likelihood of not graduating from high school; mental health concerns; and increased future involvement in the criminal justice system.”

By enacting their draconian new rules, the state of Missouri is completely ignoring science, instead, falling back on uniformed state agents with badges and guns – trained to confront the worst of society – to deal with misbehaving kids in school.

Missouri is ignoring the proven benefits of “restorative justice.”

“Thus, rather than excluding the student from the school community for misbehaving, which potentially can cause resentment, disrupt that student’s educational progress, and lead to recidivism and dropping out of school, one of the primary goals of restorative justice is to integrate the offender back into the school community as a productive member.

In essence, restorative justice practices are conflict resolution tools that involve victims, offenders, and other members of the school community. Using formal and informal conferences, or “circle groups,” victims share with offenders how they have been harmed by the offender’s behavior, offenders have opportunities to apologize to the victims, and, with the help of the victims and the other members of the school community, conference participants devise remedies for the harmful behavior.”

Instead of smart approaches like restorative justice, Missouri is set to plunge its children into a police state nightmare — guaranteeing a long-term rise in prison population and further destroying the mental health of the most vulnerable  individuals.

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